Workforce Development

Career technical education is a vital part of education improvement efforts and will play a vital role in enhancing the nation’s economy by providing skills preparation aligned to current and future labor market demands. Career technical education provides a robust opportunity for meeting the labor and education demands of the global economy.
 
“We are what we learn,” U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan has noted. If that message is true, what does it say that many of today’s children are learning essentially the same content in substantially the same way as their parents and grandparents? They are 21st century students who are still receiving a 20th century education.
 

Pam Goins, director of The Council of State Governments’ Center for Innovation and Transformation in Education, will join other education experts in a webinar discussion on how state policymakers can support deeper learning in their schools April 29. The webinar, sponsored by the National Association of State Boards of Education, will explore policies that can help students not only master academic content, but also critical thinking, problem solving, collaboration and communication skills. The goal of deeper learning is to ensure students can meet the demands of the 21st century work force.

By 2018, the U.S. will need 22 million new college degrees; the nation will fall short of that number by at least 3 million postsecondary degrees. This means not only lost wages for workers, but also lost job creation for state economies. This workshop addressed opportunities for state policymakers to impact higher education funding, align pathways leading to employment and develop strategies for meeting the demands for a skilled workforce.

By 2018, the U.S. will need 22 million new college degrees; the nation will fall short of that number by at least 3 million postsecondary degrees. This means not only lost wages for workers, but also lost job creation for state economies. This workshop addressed opportunities for state policymakers to impact higher education funding, align pathways leading to employment and develop strategies for meeting the demands for a skilled workforce.

As the global economy becomes more and more competitive, schools are looking for ways to better prepare students for college and/or the workforce. Some states have found success with various policies and programs. This briefing included a discussion of rigorous academic standards, common assessments, professional development, teacher preparation, time and technology, and state accountability systems. State leaders can determine what will work best based on the needs of individual communities. Experts provided an analysis of existing state policies and offer innovative strategies and solutions to put transformational ideas into practice.

By 2018, the U.S. will need 22 million new college degrees; the nation will fall short of that number by at least 3 million postsecondary degrees. This means not only lost wages for workers, but also lost job creation for state economies. This workshop addressed opportunities for state policymakers to impact higher education funding, align pathways leading to employment and develop strategies for meeting the demands for a skilled workforce.

Stateline Midwest

Starting as soon as this fall, the University of Wisconsin plans to begin offering courses through a new model of higher education that leaders say will transform the state’s postsecondary system. Students will be able to take online classes anytime and learn at their own pace — with credits earned based on competency rather than seat time.

The Council of State Governments' National Center for Interstate Compacts, in conjuction with the Presidents' Forum, and with support from the Lumina Foundation are working to produce a national (but not federal) compact to help states better work together to offer online courses across state lines.  This compact, in its final form, is intended to help students get access to the skills they need to compete in the global economy.  The compact will also help institutions save money by removing redundant regulatory burdens involved with offering courses on a multistate basis and help states develop a more educated and productive workforce.

In order to see robust economic growth in the states, postsecondary degree attainment must increase to produce skilled employees for the workforce.  The need for higher-skilled employees is increasing, yet the United States is not producing enough workers with a college degree to meet the growing demand.  Each year until 2025, 800,000 more college students must complete their degrees to meet the needs of the workforce.  Policymakers and education officials can assist college-goers as they seek high-quality degrees and credentials.  Additionally, policies can be enacted to help institutions increase capacity to serve more students and increase system productivity.

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