Education

Early childhood education has received increasing amounts of support in recent years. Why? Research indicates that quality early childhood education can lead to significant improvements down the road.

Proponents of year-round schooling advocate for an alternative calendar for many reasons. One of the primary reasons relates to the income-based achievement gap. Recent data indicates that this gap is widening at an alarming rate. In an effort to close the gap, some states are turning to year-round education.

CSG Midwest
At a time of general wariness across the country regarding the use of standardized tests in schools (54 percent of respondents to a 2015 national survey said they are “not helpful”), Indiana lawmakers have tried to deal with a particular problem in their state.
“It came to a point where the ISTEP had become like the Ford Edsel,” Indiana Rep. Bob Behning says.
ISTEP+ is Indiana’s statewide assessment system, and over the past few years, its unpopularity grew amid reports of long delays in getting results, software glitches, scoring errors, and concerns about the amount of classroom time being spent on the test.
Last year, the Indiana General Assembly passed a bill ensuring that ISTEP+ would indeed go the way of the Edsel. This year, under a bill signed into law in April (HB 1003), lawmakers set parameters for a new assessment system, which will be known as I-LEARN and take effect during the 2018-19 school year. 

Most Americans learn the process of how a federal bill becomes a law in elementary school civics class. However, what is not typically taught is how different the legislative process can be from state to state. Each state develops a procedure that meets its unique needs. Things such as how long a legislative session lasts and how often the sessions occur differ and affect the process for how bills are passed into law. Pennsylvania and Vermont are two examples of how states fluctuate in the way they pass legislation.  ...

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Although a final version is expected to be released next week, The Washington Post obtained preliminary budget documents for the Trump Administration’s education spending. The proposed budget would end the federal student loan forgiveness program for public sector and non-profit workers, and cut...

Representative Gene Whisnant

Individuals with disabilities are major contributors to the modern workforce. However, the unemployment rate for those with disabilities is almost double  the unemployment rate of the general population according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Taking the proper steps to provide workers with disabilities the appropriate accommodations could reduce this high unemployment rate, and provide opportunities to thrive at work. Employment is the most direct and cost-effective...

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This eCademy webinar provides an overview of workforce development initiatives in the states, including a high-level summary of state plans for implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, or WIOA. Experts on WIOA provide state examples of both the consolidated and unified plans, highlight the process used to choose the plan, and discuss implementation and intrastate regional coordination.

This eCademy webinar provides an overview of workforce development initiatives in the states, including a high-level summary of state plans for implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, or WIOA. Experts on WIOA provide state examples of both the consolidated and unified plans, highlight the process used to choose the plan, and discuss implementation and intrastate regional coordination.

K-12 public education in the U.S. is funded primarily by state and local governments. In fact, only about 8 percent of elementary and secondary education spending comes from the federal government.

How much states spend on children’s health, education, income supports and social services differs greatly according to a just-released Urban Institute report, titled Unequal Playing Field.

The top spending state – Vermont – charted per child expenditures of $13,430, three times as much as Utah’s per child spending of $4,594. The national average was $7,923. Spending in each state was  adjusted for the state cost of living.

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