Labor and Employment

June unemployment figures were released today and states are looking a little better than they were in May.  Thirty-nine states experienced a small decrease in unemployment over last month, while five states had increases and six states reported no change in their rates.  New Hampshire had the biggest month-over-month drop, falling .50% from May to 5.9%, while Nevada and Louisiana had the biggest increases, each jumping .20% in a month. 

The fiscal impact of sustained high unemployment rates is painfully clear to all state policymakers. The length of time individuals are unemployed is also having a hugely detrimental impact on state and federal bottom lines and will likely continue to impact state fiscal stability long after the recession has passed.

Where Americans are Moving

Immigration may be getting the big headlines, but probably more impactful for cities and states is the migration within the United States - both of people and of wealth. Forbes.com has a new interactive map detailing county-to-county migration patterns across the country...in many cases down to the person. How many poeple moved into or out of your community? Where did they come from or where did they go?

Unemployment rates remain high and people are unemployed for longer, exhausting state unemployment trust funds quickly.  More states are borrowing from the federal government to cover costs, which could have an impact on future fiscal stability.

This session focused on how states can grow their energy economy and thereby spur job creation. Participants engaged in a discussion with nationally recognized experts and learned the potential for renewable energy and energy efficiency to generate jobs and savings as well as what they can do at the state level to create jobs. Panelists also shared programs their states have initiated in an effort to promote energy efficiency and enhance the economy.

According to a study by the Rockefeller Institute of Government, the key to states’ success in economic development is no longer just the traditional packages of tax breaks, incentives and infrastructure, but the knowledge assets they possess in the form of their educational institutions.  Economists term this “the knowledge economy” and most successful businesses will be those that depend on research, new ideas, technology and upgraded skills of their work force.

On May 21, at the CSG 2010 Economic Summit of the States, Janet Joseph, Vice President for Technology and Strategic Planning at the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, made a presentation on economic opportunities in the new energy economy.

State eNews Issue #42 | March 17, 2010

While the debate over health care reform may be front and center on Capitol Hill this week, budget deficits and the jobs crisis that underlies them continue to headline conversations in state capitols.

Congress may soon follow suit. Whether health reform passes or not, Congress is poised to pivot to a series of bills, known collectively as the “jobs agenda,” which could have a direct impact on state...

According to a new CSG report, stimulus-funded green jobs grew by 70 percent in the fourth quarter of 2009. CSG’s original report, released in December, found roughly 13,000 green jobs were created or saved from when the Recovery Act was enacted to Sept. 30, 2009.

It’s no secret: During this recession, record numbers of workers who lost jobs are drawing benefits from state unemployment funds. Many states are feeling the pinch. In fact, the U.S. Senate approved legislation Tuesday night that extends federal emergency unemployment benefits for workers who have exhausted their basic state unemployment benefits.  But that won’t resolve the dire unemployment insurance situation.

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