Workforce Development

Leaders of the nation’s largest state and local associations were summoned to the White House this morning to hear a preview of the President’s forthcoming jobs address from Danielle Gray, Deputy Director of the National Economic Council, and Cecilia Muñoz, White House Director of Intergovernmental Affairs.  While the administration is trying to keep a close hold on details in advance of the speech, it is clear that the President will propose both a continuation of existing programs and new initiatives across three major policy areas: taxes, infrastructure, and unemployment assistance.

One of the first sentences in a recently enacted Kansas law explains the rationale for the state’s new, targeted investment in higher education: “Engineering intensive industries represent approximately one-third of the statewide payroll and tax base.”

The Midwest, once the national leader of the industrial economy, is now floundering in the knowledge- and innovation-driven global economy. The way back to economic vitality and growth, says James Duderstadt in a report for The Chicago Council on Global Affairs, will require changes in another traditional strength of the region: “our extraordinary array of colleges and universities.”

 

Three things are critical to a state if policymakers want to attract bioscience companies—a supportive and creative venture capital system, a stable tax structure and a strong education system from kindergarten through college. That was the opinion of the experts speaking during the “Encouraging American Innovation and Competing in a Global Economy—Health Care” session at The Council of State Governments’ Growth and Prosperity Virtual Summit of the States.

The age of a business may be more telling than its size in the business’s ability to create jobs. That’s according to Dane Stangler, director of the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation in Kansas City, Mo., using information from the U.S. Census Bureau, who spoke during The Council of State Governments’ Growth and Prosperity Virtual Summit of the States session, “A Culture of Entrepreneurship.”

Early learning, K-12 education and postsecondary education all combine to create competent graduates ready for 21st century jobs.  Highly-skilled workers lead to prosperity for states in the new economy.  Institutions can't wait until high school to begin preparing students for the future, whether it be technical school, college or straight into a career.

State policymakers play a critical role through funding strategies and policy decisions in developing a competent work force.  Join us on Wednesday, April 13 at 1:00 p.m...

Even as overall private-sector employment fell by 0.7 percent during the Great Recession, jobs in the life sciences grew by 1.4 percent, according to the latest state-of-the-industry study released last summer. Overall, the field of life sciences, which includes pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, gained 19,000 jobs in 2008, according to the report released by Battelle Memorial Foundation and the Biotechnology Industry Organization, known as BIO.

In his State of the State speech earlier this year, Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer made clear what he hoped to accomplish in 2011: Create more jobs in his state. “Please bring me bills that unite Montana. Bills that help businesses and create jobs and bills that prepare our students for a better tomorrow. I’ll sign them,” Schweitzer, the 2011 president of The Council of State Governments, told legislators.

 

Even as overall private-sector employment fell by 0.7 percent during the Great Recession, jobs in the life sciences grew by 1.4 percent, according to the latest state-of-the-industry study released last summer.  Overall, the field of life sciences, which includes pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, gained 19,000 jobs in 2008, according to the report released by Battelle Memorial Foundation and the Biotechnology Industry Organization, known as BIO.

 

The gap between how well states prepare and equip their work force and what is demanded in a highly dynamic, technologically advanced and globally structured 21st century economy is growing.  Yet while the gap exists and is recognized, there is neither clarity nor agreement on its nature or how to gauge its dynamics. How well a state prepares and equips its workers will determine its economic future.

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