Labor and Employment

The number of unemployed persons per job opening fell to 1.13 in June 2017, a 10-year low and significantly lower than the July 2009 peak of 6.6. In other words, we are close to having a job opening for every person that is unemployed. In the Midwest, the number of unemployed per job opening has now dropped to less than one, the lowest of any region.

A recently released report by MForesight, America's Next Manufacturing Workforce: Promising Practices in Education & Skills Building, outlines a range of successful educational initiatives, policy interventions, and pilot programs to strengthen manufacturing careers. The report emphasizes initiatives that are effective, replicable and scalable.

In 2011, the American Association of University Women, or AAUW, published The Simple Truth about the Gender Pay Gap, a comprehensive report on the state of the gender pay gap in the U.S. which is updated as new data is made available through the U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Released this spring, the most recent edition reports that in 2015 women working full time in the United States were paid 80 percent of what men were paid.

With traditional four-year colleges driving student loan debt up to a record high of $1.3 trillion and a purported “middle skills” gap, the Trump administration’s new executive order promotes paid apprenticeship programs so students can earn while they learn. Middle skills are trades like plumbing and welding that aren’t taught in four-year colleges or high school.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, an individual employer, group of employers, or an industry association can sponsor a Registered Apprenticeship program. Program sponsors provide jobs to apprentices, oversee training development, and provide hands-on learning and technical instruction for apprentices. At the successful completion of the on-the-job and instructional learning, apprentices receive an industry-issued, nationally recognized portable certificate of completion.

Representative Gene Whisnant

Individuals with disabilities are major contributors to the modern workforce. However, the unemployment rate for those with disabilities is almost double  the unemployment rate of the general population according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Taking the proper steps to provide workers with disabilities the appropriate accommodations could reduce this high unemployment rate, and provide opportunities to thrive at work. Employment is the most direct and cost-effective...

Public pension reform is at the forefront of many state policymakers' agendas for 2017. Participants in this webinar will hear a summary of legal issues around public employee pension reform in layman's terms with a focus on constitutional concerns. We will cover which reform provisions have been shot down by the courts, which provisions have held up to challenges and any lessons a state leader can take away from the totality of those rulings.

The Trump administration announced a preliminary 2018 budget proposal that included elimination of the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP). Funds from this program are allocated to states and national grantees in states to employ low-income senior citizens. SCSEP funds 43,600 positions nationwide at a cost of $9,698 per position.

The North Carolina Senate unanimously passed SB-8 on March 15th which eases occupational licensure burdens on veterans by allowing military members and their spouses to practice their profession with a license from another state while transitioning to the requirements of North Carolina. The bill, sponsored by Senators Andy Wells, Harry Brown, and Louis Pate, is a positive step towards helping military families working jobs that may require a license.

CSG Midwest
Big changes in public-sector collective bargaining are coming to Iowa under one of the first bills signed into law during the 2017 session. According to The Des Moines RegisterHF 291 got passed along mostly partisan lines and brought labor-union representatives from across Iowa to the Capitol to protest the rewrite of a 43-year-old state law. 

Pages