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When the federal government issues regulations or passes legislation without proper consultation with state leaders, state priorities may be adversely impacted and problems result. An active and lively federalism requires greater interaction and cooperation between federal policymakers and states to assure the state’s needs and goals are met. The Intergovernmental Affairs Committee will take an in-depth look at how states and the federal government work together during the policymaking process, and will examine what effective “consultation” should look like.

Nevada is home to the Tesla Gigafactory, where lithium-ion batteries for electric cars are being manufactured. The state is a test bed for Hyperloop One technology, for unmanned aerial systems and for connected and automated vehicles. Nevada was the first to pass autonomous vehicle legislation in 2011. With Project NEON, Nevada has undertaken the largest public works project in its history, which will widen the busiest stretch of highway in Las Vegas. The director of the Nevada Department of Transportation, Rudy Malfabon, will discuss how these and other initiatives are driving his state forward. Plus, the committee will engage in interactive policy discussions on the takeaways from this summer’s CSG Autonomous and Connected Vehicle Policy Academy in Detroit and a busy year for state transportation funding efforts around the country.

International trade and investments from foreign nations are major contributors to the United States economy and help support millions of good-paying jobs throughout state and local communities. In today’s global economy, it is imperative that state and local governments play a leading role in coordinating and developing an international trade and investment strategy that gets their community ready to engage and compete in the global marketplace. This session will highlight how state leaders can further engage in international trade, including trade policy and trade promotion.

This full-day event will cover innovative state practices on hiring and retaining workers with disabilities, including how the state can be a model employer, how to engage and support the business community and best practices on providing employment supports for people with disabilities. The policy academy will include success stories from Kentucky, Massachusetts, Nevada and Oregon on the policies and practices of states that lead to higher labor market engagement by people with disabilities.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee in July signed into law one of the nation’s most comprehensive paid family leave programs, offering workers paid time off for the birth or adoption of a child or for the serious medical condition of the employee or his or her family member. The legislation, which will take effect in 2020, offers eligible workers 12 weeks of either parental or medical leave, or 16 weeks for a combination of both. Only four other states guarantee paid family leave: California, New Jersey, New York and Rhode Island, with New York’s program beginning in 2018. The District of Columbia also approved a paid family leave program this year to take effect in 2020.

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