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WHEREAS, the state and local tax deduction has been a feature of the federal tax code for over 100 years, dating back to 1913; and

WHEREAS, eliminating the state and local tax deduction would increase taxes for approximately 24 percent of taxpayers nationwide; and

WHEREAS, it is in states’ best interests to stabilize health insurance markets, increase consumer choices, reduce health insurance premiums and stem health care cost growth; and

WHEREAS, regulation of health insurance markets has been a traditional area of state responsibility; and

WHEREAS, federal funding for the CHIP program has not been appropriated for 2018 or beyond; and

WHEREAS, states adopted budgets for 2018 during their 2016 or 2017 legislative sessions assuming that federal funds for CHIP would be appropriated; and

States spend billions each year on tax and financial incentives and in some states, tax expenditures can exceed revenues. The costs can also be unpredictable. The costs of some state tax incentive programs have increased quickly and unexpectedly by tens or hundreds of millions of dollars. With every public dollar being scrutinized, it is important to ask—are these incentives getting the scrutiny they deserve?

More than half of states have now legalized marijuana use—recreational or medicinal. That’s a massive shift in policy from just a decade ago. With this shift comes a slew of legislative, regulatory and fiscal questions for state policymakers to tackle. This day-long policy forum will provide an overview of the current legal landscape and best practices for taxation, regulation and licensing. The forum will discuss emerging trends and provide attendees direct exposure to Nevada’s marijuana legalization experience.

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