Content Type

The Act requires hospitals to give each patient or patient’s legal guardian an opportunity to designate a caregiver who will provide after-care assistance to the patient following discharge from the hospital. The Act also requires the hospital to record the name and contact information of the caregiver in the patient’s medical record and to notify the caregiver upon the patient’s discharge or transfer to another facility.

The Act makes “non‐consensual dissemination of private sexual images,” otherwise known as “revenge porn” a Class 4 felony. It is a crime to knowingly post sexually explicit photos, video, voice recordings, etc. of another person online without the person’s consent. Revenge porn is a growing problem due to increased use of social media and other technology. Posts are sexual exploitation and often include names, addresses, e‐mail addresses and other information that compromises the safety of victims and their families. The Act includes exceptions for telecommunications and law enforcement and voluntary exposure in public or commercial settings.

The Act establishes ABLE savings trust accounts to be administered by the Virginia College Savings Plan to facilitate the saving of private funds for paying the qualified disability expenses of certain disabled individuals. Under the federal Achieving a Better Life Experience Act of 2014, Congress authorized states to establish ABLE savings trust accounts to assist individuals and families in saving and paying for the education, housing, transportation, employment training and support, assistive technology and personal support services, health, prevention and wellness, financial management and administrative services, and other expenses of individuals who were disabled or blind prior to the age of 26. Earnings on contributions to ABLE savings trust accounts are exempt from federal income tax. Because Virginia conforms to the federal income tax laws, earnings on contributions to ABLE savings trust accounts will also be excluded from Virginia taxable income.

The Act directs the State Board of Education to include the requirement for students to pass a civics test in the high school competency requirements for graduation, beginning in the 2016-17 school year.

The Uniform Voidable Transactions Act (UVTA), formerly named the Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act (UFTA), strengthens creditor protections by providing remedies for certain transactions by a debtor that are unfair to the debtor’s creditors. The 2014 amendments to the UVTA address a small number of narrowly-defined issues, and are not a comprehensive revision of the act. The Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act was promulgated in 1984 and has been enacted by 43 states, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Virgin Islands as of 2014. The act replaced the very similar Uniform Fraudulent Conveyance Act, which was promulgated in 1918 and remains in force in two states as of 2014.

The Act encourages local workforce investment boards to implement pay-for-performance contract strategy incentives for training services as an alternative model to traditional programs. The Act also authorizes local workforce investment boards to allocate funds to the extent permissible under §§ 128(b) and 133(b) of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (P.L. 113-128) for pay-for-performance partnerships.

The Act requires health care facilities that perform mammography examinations to communicate mammographic breast density information to patients.

In 2002, the NCSBN Delegate Assembly approved the adoption of model language for a licensure compact for APRNs that would facilitate interstate practice for all four APRN roles: nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, clinical nurse specialists, and nurse anesthetists. Under the APRN Compact, only states that adopted the RN and LPN/VN NLC would be eligible to implement the compact for APRNs. Utah was the first state to pass APRN Compact legislation in 2004 (Senate Bill 107) with Iowa following shortly thereafter that same year (House File 784). Texas passed the law in June 2007 (House Bill 2426). Implementation of the APRN Compact was halted due to issues surrounding lack of uniformity of APRN titles and practice from state to state. In response, NCSBN, along with other nursing organizations, developed and began implementing the APRN Consensus Model, which addressed these problems.

Naloxone is a very effective and safe substance to reduce the effects of opioid drug overdose and prevent deaths. Overdose deaths more than doubled between 1999 and 2010. In 2010, deaths from both prescription drug and illicit drug overdoses surpassed traffic accidents as the number one cause of death for persons less than 65 years old. States essentially use two policy options to increase access to naloxone. A small minority of states allow naloxone sales by a pharmacy without a prescription. A majority of states allow pharmacists to dispense naloxone under a standing order from a licensed medical professional.

All states have statutes which allow individuals to delegate substitute decision-making authority. In Idaho, the main examples are financial powers of attorney and medical powers of attorney and mental health powers of attorney. If the person executes the document in Idaho and stays in Idaho, the documents will be recognized. However, in our mobile society, individuals move, travel, and may end up needing the document to be recognized in another jurisdiction. This Act is creating that ability.

Pages