With the 2016 primary election approaching, voting procedures are taking center stage again. CSG’s Overseas Voting Initiative recently had its fifth working group meeting in Newport Beach, Calif., and finalized policy recommendations intended to improve voting processes for U.S. military and civilians overseas. Policy group members will present the recommendations at the 2015 CSG National Conference, Dec. 10-13, in Nashville.

During a recent CSG eCademy webcast, “Pricing Rooftop Solar: Sustainability, Fairness & Promoting Productivity,” two former regulatory commissioners discussed the process used to set utility rates and how to ensure cost fairness and affordability while enabling the growth of distributed generation.

The U.S. Supreme Court’s October 2015 term is one to watch not only because the court has accepted numerous cases on controversial topics but also because many of the Supreme Court’s decisions this term, including a number of cases affecting the states, are likely to be discussed by the 2016 presidential candidates as the election heats up. Here is a preview of the most significant cases for the states that the court has agreed to decide so far.

While the definition of giftedness varies from state to state, federal legislation is quite clear about the definition of a gifted student. According to the No Child Left Behind Act, “gifted and talented” refers to students “who give evidence of high achievement capabilities in such areas as intellectual, creative, artistic, or leadership capacity, or in specific academic fields, and who need services or activities not ordinarily provided by the school in order to fully develop those capabilities.”

Experts say an education in science, technology, engineering, arts and math—or STEAM—is essential to building an innovative workforce in the United States, and the sooner students delve into STEAM education, the better.