Publications

California Assembly Majority Leader Ian Calderon chairs the state’s Select Committee on Youth and California’s Future and is a founding member and co-chair of the Legislative Technology and Innovation Caucus. He believes technology is a key driver for economic development efforts, and the state can help build the technology infrastructure and ensure the future workforce is well equipped for the jobs of tomorrow.

By Shannon Riess
Information is key whenever a disaster strikes. Lack of information could be detrimental to populations, neighborhoods and local economies. Many of the technological advances in the field of emergency management have been developed in order to solve the information problem and increase situational awareness. Data allows emergency managers to create a common operating picture that can help the state to predict and mitigate against the impacts of disasters, identify at-risk populations and respond to those areas in need, and recover from the effects of a disaster when a threat has passed. Information systems and emergency management specific software have led states to carry out their missions faster, better and more cost efficiently.

At any given moment, your data can be hacked and sold to the highest bidder. Very likely, sensitive data can be stolen and corrupted, possibly taking your entire organization to its knees. Neither of these outcomes is beneficial for your organization. In fact, the consequences can be devastating. It doesn’t take an information technology specialist to understand and be proactive in protecting your state’s cyber assets. In fact, assuring cybersecurity requires all members of an organization—including a state government—to protect themselves, their members and organization by asking a few simple questions and following procedures. What’s more, lawmakers share fiduciary responsibility to oversee the cybersecurity risks for a state.

Since 1963, every U.S. president has set aside a week to highlight the importance of small businesses and to recognize their accomplishments through innovation and growth. This year was no different. On April 29, President Barack Obama declared May 1-7 as National Small Business Week, an annual event organized by the U.S. Small Business Administration, or SBA

Air regulators from more than 20 state and local agencies discussed the Clean Power Plan and its potential impact on states during the Association of Air Pollution Control Agencies’ mid-year meeting April 28-29 in Columbia, South Carolina. Approximately 100 participants attended the event, which included presentations and panels on topics ranging from environmental justice to implementation of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur dioxide, ozone and other pollutants to regulatory impact analyses.

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