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The Council of State Governments hosted its 2014 National Conference from August 9-13 in Anchorage, Alaska. The meeting provided state leaders with a robust agenda structured to tackle some of the most pressing issues facing state governments. If you would like to watch any of the sessions or would like to get copies of the presentations, please visit the individual session pages housed here in the Knowledge Center. Audio of many of the presentations will be available shortly.

The U.S. Department of Labor has published a notice in the Federal Register proposing a new rule that could extend overtime protections to almost 5 million additional workers as early as 2016. Current law requires employers pay overtime for non-salaried workers. Salaried employees are defined by a set of criteria, including job duties and a salary threshold. The proposed new rule would more than double the salary threshold and tie it to inflation, which means more workers would qualify for overtime protections. The number of workers that would be affected by the changes varies by age, education level and state; middle-aged, educated workers would see the biggest impact.

Making the transition between military service and civilian life can be a difficult challenge for service members. Many find themselves without a job or the means to support a family without returning to school to further their knowledge and skills. But making the move from a battlefield to a college campus can be a difficult, isolating experience for student veterans.

Although women now serve alongside men on the battlefield in places like Iraq and Afghanistan, there is one place where male and female soldiers may not be getting the same treatment. That place is after they return home and become veterans.

As consumers continue to use the Internet to acquire goods, members of Congress are attempting to solve a quirk in tax law that is preventing states from collecting potential sales tax revenue. Bills in both the House and Senate aim to give states the authority to require out-of-state businesses selling online or through catalogs to collect taxes already owed under state law the same way local businesses do. Similar legislation failed to reach President Obama’s desk last Congress, but proponents are moving swiftly to ensure the bills remain at the top of the Congressional agenda.

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