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The Council of State Governments hosted its 2015 National Conference from December 10th-13th in Nashville, Tennessee. The meeting provided state leaders with a robust agenda structured to tackle some of the most pressing issues facing state governments. If you would like to watch any of the sessions or would like to get copies of the presentations, please visit the individual session pages housed here in the Knowledge Center. Audio of many of the presentations will be available shortly.

The Council of State Governments hosted its 2014 National Conference from August 9-13 in Anchorage, Alaska. The meeting provided state leaders with a robust agenda structured to tackle some of the most pressing issues facing state governments. If you would like to watch any of the sessions or would like to get copies of the presentations, please visit the individual session pages housed here in the Knowledge Center. Audio of many of the presentations will be available shortly.

Vermont recently became the fourth state—following Oregon, California and West Virginia—to enact automatic voter registration. Starting July 1, 2017, eligible Vermont residents will be automatically registered to vote when they apply for a state driver’s license.

The state Department of Motor Vehicles will have a system that identifies the eligible voters and automatically sends their information to the appropriate town or city clerk for addition to voter checklists, unless the individual opts out.

“While states...

During a recent CSG eCademy webcast, “The Every Student Succeeds Act: What Does it Mean for State Accountability and Data?” experts discussed the increased flexibility that the new law gives states and policymakers as well as opportunities to share better data with schools and communities. The Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA, is the new name of the reauthorized Elementary and Secondary Education Act. ESSA replaces the No Child Left Behind Act and goes into effect at the beginning of the 2017-18 school year.

It was a different crowd at the Supreme Court on April 18. The number of children on the courthouse steps may have exceeded the number of adults, and the voices on the microphones were speaking English and Spanish. Inside the courtroom, many members of Congress, cabinet members and foreign dignitaries filled the seats. Among those present were U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch, Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois, Sen. Bob Menendez of New Jersey, Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson and chief justice of Canada, Beverley McLachlin. United States v. Texas is about different things to different people. For some it is about keeping families together, for some others it is about executive overreach and for many it is about “standing” to sue the federal government.

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