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Econ Piggy

The Census Bureau released data from its Annual Survey of Public Pensions today, which provides a financial overview of state- and locally-administered defined benefit pension systems. The report found that earnings on investments for those pension systems increased from $382.2 billion in 2013 to $537.5 billion in 2014 – a 38.6 percent jump. In 2012, earnings totaled just $96 billion.

A 2014 report by the Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law predicts that the legalization of same-sex marriage could have a combined economic impact across all states of $2.6 billion during the first three years, primarily due to increased spending on weddings by same-sex resident couples and their out-of-state guests. In addition, the report estimates that legalization will boost state and local sales tax revenue by $184.7 million and support more than 13,000 jobs. The potential economic and fiscal impact varies across states.

A new report by the U.S. Election Assistance Commission, the 2014 Election Administration and Voting Survey Comprehensive Report, says that on average, about one out of every 70 voters who cast their vote in a polling place cast a provisional ballot. A total of 892,202 provisional ballots were submitted to be counted in the 2014 Federal election of which 72.2 percent were counted in full and 8.1 percent were partially counted. A total of 171,443 provisional ballots – or 19.2 percent – were rejected.

A new report by the U.S. Election Assistance Commission, the 2014 Election Administration and Voting Survey Comprehensive Report, says that on average, about one out of every 70 voters who cast their vote in a polling place cast a provisional ballot. A total of 892,202 provisional ballots were submitted to be counted in the 2014 Federal election of which 72.2 percent were counted in full and 8.1 percent were partially counted. A total of 171,443 provisional ballots – or 19.2 percent – were rejected.

The Department of Labor published a notice in the Federal Register today proposing a new rule that could extend overtime protections to almost 5 million additional workers as early as 2016. The law requires that employers pay overtime for non-salaried workers. Salaried employees are defined by a set of criteria, including job duties and a salary threshold. The new rules would more than double the salary threshold and tie it to inflation, which means more workers would qualify for overtime protections. 

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