Capitol Comments

In April, the federal government released $485 million in grants to states to combat the opioid crisis. The amounts of the grants, the same in both 2017 and this year, vary from $2million to states with less population to $44.7 million dollars to California.

Ten emergency departments in Colorado volunteered to participate in a Colorado Hospital Association project to reduce the use of opioids over a six-month period in 2017. Data collected upon completion of the project showed a 36 percent reduction in opioid use, far exceeding the project goal of a 15 percent reduction. All ten hospital emergency departments posted opioid prescription rates beat the 15 percent reduction goal.

While state policy makers frequently express concern about the increasing percentage of state funds required to fund their Medicaid programs, the programs bring in large amounts of federal dollars to states. Across all states, two thirds of all federal grant funds received by states in 2017 are for Medicaid health services for low-income, disabled and elderly individuals. 

Jason Helgerson, leaving his job this week as New York Medicaid director after 7 years,  blogged in Health Affairs about the lessons he learned.  He says in the post that when his New York experience is combined with the previous 4 years as Wisconsin Medicaid director, he is the nation’s longest-serving Medicaid director. The average tenure of a Medicaid director, according to Helgerson, is 19 months.

Earlier this week, the head of the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, Seema Verma, travelled to Arkansas and signed a waiver request to require Medicaid enrollees to work or prepare for a job. The work requirement will only impact the expansion population, specifically childless adults 19 to 49 years old. They will be required to work or participate in activities such as volunteering or vocational training for 20 hours per week. The requirement will be phased in between June and September 2018.

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