The U.S. Senate will return to Washington, D.C., Nov. 12, followed soon by the U.S. House of Representatives, according to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.

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With less than a month before the Nov. 4 midterm elections, voting laws in eight states are being challenged in state and federal courts, some going all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. This eCademy session sheds light on several recent voting law challenges across the country and how these cases may impact the states in November and beyond.

In the 2012 U.S. presidential election, nearly 60 percent of registered stateside voters cast their ballots successfully. In the same election, only 18 percent of registered U.S. military and overseas voters requested ballots and slightly fewer than 13 percent of those voters actually returned ballots. This is not a new problem, according to Kamanzi Kalisa, director of the new Overseas Voting Initiative at The Council of State Governments. “For decades, members of the U.S. military and their dependents have experienced problems at every step of the overseas voting process—from registering to vote and requesting or receiving absentee ballots to returning those absentee ballots,” said Kalisa.

Shortly after the U.S. Supreme Court in 2013 ruled portions of the 1965 Voting Rights Act related to voter IDs were outdated and unconstitutional, states took action. But laws in several states that have imposed strict new photo identification requirements for voters are in limbo, with courts questioning whether concerns over voter fraud outweigh individuals exercising their right to vote.

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Many U.S.-based companies are in the process of reincorporating their headquarters to countries with lower corporate tax rates. This is commonly known as “inversions” or “expatriations” and takes place when a company merges or acquires a foreign company with the nearly exclusive purpose of paying lower corporate taxes.

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